RV Dump Stations Olympia, Washington

Olympia, the capital of Washington, is located at the southern end of Puget Sound and is 60 miles southwest of Seattle. Many of the RV dump stations in Washington are in the Olympia area, which also boasts outdoor marvels like Hurricane Ridge and Tumwater Falls Park as well as indoor attractions the Nisqually Red Wind Casino and the state capital building. 

Olympia RV Dump Stations

1. Millersylvania State Park

Location
Hours
  • Winter Hours
  • 8 a.m. to dusk
  • Summer Hours
  • 6:30 a.m. to dusk
Features
Millersylvania State Park is actually 10 miles south of Olympia. The dump station is open all year and does have water.
Additional Info
Pricing: Free for registered guests; $5 for visitors
Website

2. American Heritage Campground

Location
Hours
  • 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Features
The camp is open all year and has water.
Additional Info
Pricing: Call for pricing
Website

3. Penrose Point State Park

Location
Hours
  • Winter Hours
  • 8 a.m. to dusk
  • Summer Hours
  • 6:30 a.m. to dusk
Features
Lakebay is around 57 miles north of Olympia. The dump station is open all year and has water.
Additional Info
Pricing: Free for registered guests; $5 for visitors 
Website

4. Midway RV Park

Location
Hours
  • 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. every day
Features
Centralia is about 25 miles south of Olympia. The dump station is open all year and provides potable water and rinse water. It is also big rig friendly. 
Additional Info
Pricing: Free for registered guests; $10.00 for visitors 
Website

5. LOTT Clean Water Alliance

Location
Hours
  • Monday – Friday
  • 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. 
Features
The dump station is located at the intersection of Franklin and B streets. It has rinse water available and is one of the free RV dump stations in Washington. 
Additional Info
Pricing: Free
Website
Licensed from Sanidumps.com

Top RV Rentals in Olympia

Visit Nearby State Parks

Millersylvania State Park

Millersylvania State Park is located 8 miles south of Olympia in Washington. Its 903 acres include Deep Lake, as well as 3,300 feet of freshwater shoreline and wooded areas of old-growth cedar and fir trees. Thanks to the state park’s well-preserved Civilian Conservation Corps landscape, it was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 2009... Read more