Yucca House National Monument

Explore one of the biggest archaeological sites in Colorado at the Yucca House National Monument. Once the home of a large group of Ancestral Puebloan people, the area has been abandoned for more than 700 years. Unlike other Ancestral Puebloan sites in the region, Yucca House has not been excavated — it's a unique opportunity to see an important historic site as it appeared to the first explorers in the region. With its expansive mountain views and wild, undeveloped feeling, this lightly visited park offers a fascinating glimpse at ancient life. 

Things to Do

Things To Do Near Yucca House National Monument

The Yucca House National Monument is largely undeveloped, so you can explore freely and see the ancient walls up close — take care as the site is delicate, and the stones may be unstable. Well-worn walking paths help guide you through the site, but there are no interpretive signs or pamphlets. The nearby town of Cortez has plenty of options for camping, shopping, and dining.

Hiking Trails

Sightseeing

Museums

Nearby Shops and Restaurants

map-marker-alt-regular How to Get There

How To Get To Yucca House National Monument

Getting to Yucca House National Monument is a bit of an adventure — there are no signs, and cellphone service can be spotty. To get there, head south on US-491 from Cortez. After about eight miles, turn right on MC County Road B. Drive about one mile. Soon after you cross the paved MC Road 21, keep an eye out for the next dirt road; turn right, looking for the signs for the Box Bar Ranch. Drive for about 1.4 miles, keeping an eye out for a white house with a red roof. Once you reach the house's driveway, you'll see the gate for the national monument on the left.

Address

19751 Rd B, Cortez, CO 81321

Fee: Entry fee $0

Yucca House National Monument is the rare opportunity to explore an unexcavated Ancestral Puebloan site. It's a fantastic complement to other local sites, including the nearby Mesa Verde National Park. An RV is a great way to enjoy Yucca House and the other natural and historic spots in southwestern Colorado.