Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument

In the 1930s, the Arizona government donated land to the federal government, and that land became the Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument in 1937. The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) designated the land as a biosphere reserve in 1976, which led to more than 95% of the region becoming a protected wilderness area just a few years later. As you wander through the desert landscape, you'll see more than 30 types of cacti along with native animals.

Things to Do

Things To Do Near Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument

The Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument has on-site park rangers who lead nighttime walks and host interpretive activities for visitors. Your little ones can sign up for special programs and become Junior Rangers before you leave. The Ajo Mountain Drive takes you on a 21-mile scenic drive along a gravel road. You can bring your bike and explore Bates Well Road or Puerto Blanco Road. There are also equestrian trails marked for horseback riders.

Hiking Trails

Sightseeing

Museums

Nearby Shops and Restaurants

map-marker-alt-regular How to Get There

How To Get To Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument

The Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument has a convenient location just north of Highway 85. To reach the national monument, take Highway 85. Once you pass through Lukeville, the Visitors Center is only five miles ahead.

Address

10 Organ Pipe Dr., Ajo, AZ 85321

Fee: Entry fee (per person) $15

Fee: Entry fee (per motorcycle) $20

Fee: Entry fee (per vehicle) $25

As one of a small handful of UNESCO biosphere reserves in the country, the Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument features more than 30 different types of cacti along with hundreds of wild animals and loads of scenic drives. If you want an easy way to get from the monument to other popular attractions, renting an RV is a good idea.